Sustainability: Gardening

Sustainability >Gardening

Our approach to gardening has evolved over many years. We tried it all: row gardening, square foot gardening, bio-intensive (Jeavons), permaculture, and no dig. Each of these has informed our philosophy, practices, and principles. Each of these has also been practiced under the umbrella of organic/natural.

Here are some of our guiding principles. I would like to explore these more in separate posts. Our gardening principles are just that, principles not rules. We have experimented enough to know what each plant likes, doesn’t like, and where we can “fudge the edges.” The only time we use rules is if we are planting something for the very first time or trying again after repeated failures.

  • Compost
  • Grow what you eat
  • Eat what you grow
  • Plant perennials and things you can save seeds from
  • Store your surplus wisely
  • Stay out of the growing beds
  • People power not petroleum power
  • Close the circle

Time in the Gardens:

In March and April, we tend to spend a couple of hours a week in the gardens. Our gardening season begins in earnest on the Spring Equinox. This is when when we prune the blackberries, thin the strawberries, clear out the stalks in the pollinator garden, move manure and bedding to the compost, and start harvesting asparagus. Michael begins mowing the lawn and we use it in equal parts for compost and chicken bedding.

May and June are the months when we spend the most amount of time in the kitchen garden. There are beds to prepare, compost to turn, compost to spread, seeds to start, and then the near constant weeding. Our last planting day is the Summer Solstice. After that we tend the plants that are already growing. During these months it is not unusual for me to spend a couple of hours doing garden work each morning. Kelly then spends most of Saturday doing the jobs that he is better at than I am. Michael is still cutting grass for compost and chicken bedding. This is also the time for building projects.

By July and August, we are simply weeding for about a half an hour on weekdays and maybe a couple of hours on Saturday morning. Kelly takes over the primary Saturday weeding job because I am harvesting daily and processing the foods. Harvesting hours in the kitchen garden are hard to calculate because I do it as I move through each bed weeding, checking for bugs, and diseased plants. Somedays I bring in huge baskets of food, somedays a small container. The orchard and herb garden begins to fourish with herbs hitting their peak just about the same time that the blackberries are ready. It is utter chaos at times.

September, October, and November are the months when my enthusiasm wanes just a bit. I’ve been weeding for 5 months and there are 3 more to go. Some garden beds begin to look empty as the plants complete their lifecycle and die back. Some beds have huge flowering stalks that will become next year’s seeds. By the Autumn equinox we cover the compost so the winter rains don’t wash all the nutrients away. The chicken house gets cleaned out down to the bare earth in late October and the bedding added to the new compost pile. The rabbit manure is collected and added to the new pile too. This is also the time for more building projects.

Late November is the time to make sure all the produce is out of the garden, the seeds are safely stored, and all the pots are clean and waiting for the start of another gardening season.

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